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Our Forebear Regiment 67th of Foot, having served 21 years of active service in India was ordered by to England in 1826. In commemoration of this, King George IV authorized the figure of the Royal Bengal Tiger with the word 'India' superscribed to be borne on its Regimental Colour and other appointments. The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment retains this honour today and maintains the nickname of 'The Tigers'.

Officers and Solider of the Regiment ware a 'Tiger' badge on their right arm.

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The Tigers' Regimental Association is based at Regimental Headquarters at the Tower of London. Its main aims are to foster the spirit of comradeship between all members of the Regiment and to provide assistance to past and present members, their wives, children or other dependents who are in distress or suffering financial hardship. Its membership, which is free, comprises all officers and soldiers who have served or are serving in the Tigers. The forebear regiments also have their own regimental associations, the details of which can be obtained from Regimental Headquarters.

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THE TIGERS’ FOREBEAR REGIMENTS IN THE PENINSULAR WAR

Colonel Patrick Crowley, Deputy Colonel Heritage

The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment (PWRR) or ‘The Tigers’ have a long and distinguished military heritage, with strong connections to the Peninsular War of 1808-1814. This is particularly notable, when it comes to the commemoration of the Battle of Albuhera and the part played by:

• 3rd Foot, The Buffs, later The Royal East Kent Regiment,
• 2nd Battalion 31st Foot, later The East Surrey Regiment and

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There remain many opportunities for ‘The Tigers’ to serve overseas, either with a battalion or as an individual, including exchange opportunities in Australia and New Zealand or loan service posts in Eastern Europe and Western Africa. Training activities are varied and overseas training exercises offer soldiers the opportunity to experience varied conditions in unique and unusual terrain.

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In 1926 The Buffs placed their ‘Book of Life’, which contained the names of members of the Regiment killed in the Great War, in the Warrior’s Chapel in Canterbury Cathedral. Further ‘Books of Life’ commemorating those who died in the Second World War whilst serving in the Buffs including many Danes. Their allied Regiment, The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada were subsequently added. The Queen’s Regiment and The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment also now have their ‘Books of Life’ there, and the Chapel is designated the Regimental Chapel.

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VICTORY IN EUROPE (VE) DAY (8 MAY 1945) –
PRINCESS OF WALES’S ROYAL REGIMENT (PWRR)

Both VE Day and Victory in Japan Day (VJ Day) are notable anniversaries for the United Kingdom and the World; marking the end of horrific experiences and great sacrifice. 2020 would have marked significant 75th commemorations, which have obviously been adversely affected by Coronavirus 19.

Your local Regiment of London and the South East, The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment (PWRR), the Tigers, remembers the sacrifices made by its forebear regiments in the Second World War