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Each Battalion holds two Colours - The Queen's Colour and the Regimental Colour. The Colours of The 3rd Battalion The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment are as illustrated below. The other Battalion’s Colours are identical, apart from the numeral. The Queen’s Colour, the senior Colour, displays forty-two battle honours from the First and Second World Wars. The Regimental Colour displays forty other battle honours, which include ‘Tangier 1662-80’, the oldest battle honour in the British Army, and ‘Korea 1950-51’, which is the Regiment’s most recent battle honour.

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Parachuting has been required as a military skill for some soldiers and has been both a sport and an adventure training activity. Many soldiers from the Regular battalions had the opportunity to parachute because of their experience of being with 5 Airborne Brigade and earned their ‘wings’. Others have jumped during adventure training in Canada, whilst the Regimental Free-Fall Team, ‘The Tigers’, has given some soldiers the opportunity to help recruit and become semiprofessional at the sport, during their busy display programme each year.

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THE GLORIOUS FIRST OF JUNE

WAR OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION - 1 JUNE 1794

The Queen’s (Second) Royal Regiment of Foot

After the Revolution in France the French declared war on Great Britain on 11 February 1793, thus beginning a war, which as the later Napoleonic War, ended at Waterloo in 1815.

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In 1689 the Lord High Admiral’s Regiment, the 3rd Foot, was disbanded. The Holland Regiment took its place as the 3rd Regiment of Foot, and Prince George of Denmark, who was the husband of Princess (later Queen) Anne and Lord High Admiral, was appointed Honorary Colonel. From 1689 until his death in 1708, and following the custom of the time, The Holland Regiment was known as Prince George of Denmark’s Regiment.

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The first link that the Regiment had with HRH The Princess of Wales was in 1714 when The Queen's took on the title of HRH The Princess of Wales Own Royal Regiment. The then Princess of Wales was Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach, more commonly known as Caroline of Ansbach. She married the then Prince of Wales who later became King George II.

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Since the foundation of The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment on the 9th September 1992, the Regiment has continued to maintain the best traditions of the past, whilst establishing a sound professional reputation in its new guise. The inherited traditions are explained in other parts of this Online Museum; this chapter illustrates the activities of the current Regiment.

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The re-organisation of the Army in the early 1990s, called Options for Change, necessitated new Collects or regimental prayers, and provided the opportunity to amend existing ones. The current collection is the work of the Reverend R A McDowall and included the Regimental Collect of The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment. It is said at all religious services that include the Regiment and reads as follows:

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The Tigers are a fighting regiment - we thrive on complex, tough operations. We are the senior English Regiment of the Line. We are forward looking, yet fiercely proud of our famous forebear regiments whose fighting spirit and traditions thrive in today’s Regiment.

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The Story of the Peninsular War Medals of Privates Hammond and Holloway from The Die-Hards Journals

I have recently found correspondence in the Die-Hards journals relating to the origins of the Peninsular War medal incorporated into the

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The 1st Battalion of The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment has the unique Army distinction of still retaining a Third or ‘Colonel’s’ Colour. This distinction, dating from the late 17th Century, was inherited from The Queen’s Royal Regiment.