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This lacquered and inlaid officer’s table is a fine example of what would now be considered antique campaign furniture. Military cammpaign furniture was designed to be carried on campaigns. This table came apart into two pieces and folded flat for ease of transport. The design is of a Chinese style believed to be the mid to late 1800s.

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The clay maquette was sculpted by Mary Beattie Scott and shows the Landing at ‘V’ Beach, Cape Helles, Turkey on 25th April 1915 from the Collier the River Clyde. The final bronze version now hangs in St Paul’s Cathedral in London.

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The SS River Clyde was a 3,913 GRT British collier built by Russell & Co of Port Glasgow on the Firth of Clyde and completed in March 1905. In the First World War the Admiralty requisitioned her for the Royal Navy and in 1915 she took part in the Gallipoli landings.

Entry in 1915 the River Clyde was adapted to be a landing ship for the joint French and British invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsula.

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This is the painting of Percy Kirke the Younger, who was Colonel of the Regiment from 1710-1741.

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The German grenade-thrower was officially designated “Granatenwerfer 16” and the grenade “Wurfgranate 16”.

This German Trench Mortar was made by Maschinanfabrik Alfred Wolff, Berlin SW68 and shows a four fin grenade.

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This particular Gorget was found on the Waterloo Battlefield after the battle and returned to the regiment but we have failed to find an officer that served there.

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This Gorget was worn by an Officer of The Queen’s Royal Regiment and was the last piece of armour worn by soldiers, but at this time it was purely for decoration.

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Embroidered postcards from WW1 represent wonderful examples of art from the period. The majority of embroidered postcards from World War One were produced between 1914 and 1918 and featured many different designs. Generally up to 25 were embroidered by hand onto silk mesh strips, usually by French or Belgium women working at home or in refugee camps. They were then sent to factories to be cut and mounted on postcards.

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The Hawkins grenade was in use from 1942 to about 1955 by the British Army and the Home Guard.

After the evacuation from Dunkirk in May/June 1940 it was realised that there was the need for a new anti-tank weapon. It was roughly four months later Captain Hawkins submitted a design for a hand thrown anti-tank mine. After successful trails the General Staff placed an initial order for 2.5 million Hawkins Grenades.

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The powder horn was carved and carried by a soldier of the Queen Dowager's Regiment. It has a map of North America in 1707 carved into the horn. It was purchased by an Ensign Holdsworth of the Regiment. He had silver embellishments added and it was mounted on a wooden base. He presented it to the Officers' Mess in 1837.

The inscription on the top of the horn reads:

Carved by a Soldier
of the Regiment
1707.
2nd Queen's
Royal Regiment
Presented to the Officers' Mess
By
Ensign Holdsworth
1837