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This bronze bust of a Tiger on a wooden plinth with the Regimental Badge, by Mark Coreth, who is well know for his sculptures of animals in motion, was commissioned my Lieutenant Colonel Adam Edmounds, who Commanded The 3rd Battalion from 2006 to 2008, presenting it to the Officers' Mess on departing the Battalion.

This piece is a fine example of Mark Coreth's work.

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This silver tiger statuette celebrates the recipients of the Needlemakers’ Sword, which is presented to the outstanding subaltern of the battalion each year, as selected by his superiors and peers. It was presented by Lieutenant Colonel AP Guthrie TD, who was the Commanding Officer of the 3rd Battalion from 2003 to 2015. The font silver plinth details those individuals who have received this prestigious award.

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There remain many opportunities for ‘The Tigers’ to serve overseas, either with a battalion or as an individual, including exchange opportunities in Australia and New Zealand or loan service posts in Eastern Europe and Western Africa. Training activities are varied and overseas training exercises offer soldiers the opportunity to experience varied conditions in unique and unusual terrain.

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This scarlet tunic from the Royal Sussex Regiment showing details of the metal shoulder title of the 5th Territorial Battalion the Royal Sussex Regiment also a button on the tunic and the collar badge.

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In 1926 The Buffs placed their ‘Book of Life’, which contained the names of members of the Regiment killed in the Great War, in the Warrior’s Chapel in Canterbury Cathedral. Further ‘Books of Life’ commemorating those who died in the Second World War whilst serving in the Buffs including many Danes. Their allied Regiment, The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada were subsequently added. The Queen’s Regiment and The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment also now have their ‘Books of Life’ there, and the Chapel is designated the Regimental Chapel.

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One of the most dazzling pieces in the Officers’ Mess, the Petit jugs are always on display in a prominent place. They are in immaculate condition with their exquisitely ornate detail shining to a high polish. The Petit jugs are a pair of highly ornate silver claret jugs, with lids and applied vine leafs to the bodies. Unlike the Queen’s decanters they are not used for pouring wine, but are reserved only for display.

The inscription reads, “From the relatives of the late John Petit CB Lt Col Commanding the 50th Regiment.”

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These pieces are amongst the most delicate and ornate of any held in the Officers’ Mess. They consist of twin pairs of claret decanters with chased silver mounts to the neck with animals and female masks. Model paschal lamb stoppers adorn the tops, with supporting silver bases in the form of 3 sphinxes – indicating the inherited battle honour from the Queen’s of Egypt which underpins all others on the Regimental Colour. The main bodies consist of etched glass bodies engraved with Regimental insignia, bows, floral and leaf patterns.

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The type 14 was an early hand grenade from WW1 but was not mass produced as it was felt the type 36 was a much better weapon.

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VICTORY IN EUROPE (VE) DAY (8 MAY 1945) –
PRINCESS OF WALES’S ROYAL REGIMENT (PWRR)

Both VE Day and Victory in Japan Day (VJ Day) are notable anniversaries for the United Kingdom and the World; marking the end of horrific experiences and great sacrifice. 2020 would have marked significant 75th commemorations, which have obviously been adversely affected by Coronavirus 19.

Your local Regiment of London and the South East, The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment (PWRR), the Tigers, remembers the sacrifices made by its forebear regiments in the Second World War

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GRD Moor was originally commissioned into the 3rd Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment and in August 1915 was granted a regular commission.