Search Again
artefact

This scarlet tunic from the Royal Sussex Regiment showing details of the metal shoulder title of the 5th Territorial Battalion the Royal Sussex Regiment also a button on the tunic and the collar badge.

story

In 1926 The Buffs placed their ‘Book of Life’, which contained the names of members of the Regiment killed in the Great War, in the Warrior’s Chapel in Canterbury Cathedral. Further ‘Books of Life’ commemorating those who died in the Second World War whilst serving in the Buffs including many Danes. Their allied Regiment, The Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada were subsequently added. The Queen’s Regiment and The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment also now have their ‘Books of Life’ there, and the Chapel is designated the Regimental Chapel.

artefact

One of the most dazzling pieces in the Officers’ Mess, the Petit jugs are always on display in a prominent place. They are in immaculate condition with their exquisitely ornate detail shining to a high polish. The Petit jugs are a pair of highly ornate silver claret jugs, with lids and applied vine leafs to the bodies. Unlike the Queen’s decanters they are not used for pouring wine, but are reserved only for display.

The inscription reads, “From the relatives of the late John Petit CB Lt Col Commanding the 50th Regiment.”

artefact

These pieces are amongst the most delicate and ornate of any held in the Officers’ Mess. They consist of twin pairs of claret decanters with chased silver mounts to the neck with animals and female masks. Model paschal lamb stoppers adorn the tops, with supporting silver bases in the form of 3 sphinxes – indicating the inherited battle honour from the Queen’s of Egypt which underpins all others on the Regimental Colour. The main bodies consist of etched glass bodies engraved with Regimental insignia, bows, floral and leaf patterns.

artefact

The type 14 was an early hand grenade from WW1 but was not mass produced as it was felt the type 36 was a much better weapon.

artefact

GRD Moor was originally commissioned into the 3rd Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment and in August 1915 was granted a regular commission.

artefact

The story here is not so much that Lane won a VC at the battle of Taku Forts in 1860 along with 3 officers from the 67th Regiment; it is that he acquired a second one along the way and both of them are now owned by the Royal Hampshire Regiment Museum in Winchester.

Citation:

No. 612 Private Thomas Lane VC
Taku Forts 21st August 1860

person

WO2 Falconer was the Company Sergeant Major of C Company in heavy mounted and dismounted fighting including Op Waterloo and Danny Boy. He evacuated over twenty casualties from battle, often at great personal risk to himself, always ensuring they reached medical aid as soon as possible.

artefact

Commonly known as the Very pistol this artefact was manufactured in Birmingham during 1918 by Webley and Scott Ltd and shows slight damage to the rim. Mainly brass with wooden hand grips it is attached to a lanyard that would be connected to the firer to prevent loss. The military proof marks and maker’s marks can be seen. It was introduced in 1914 and was used extensively by British and Empire armed forces during World War 1. This version is the Number 1 Mark III* as it has a bell shaped mouth safety hand guard fitted to the front of the barrel.

artefact

Silver desk unit comprising, silver octagonal tray set on 4 claw & acanthus feet. Rim beaded with scroll & scallop attachments. The top plain with qty 4 rivet heads & 2 beaded mounts to hold the 2 cut crystal (Tyrone) glass ink bottles.

The bottles are square (2 7/8" x 2 7/8") with silver tops, square/bevelled, surmounted by a lion on a crown and engraved The Queen's Own'.