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The 1st Battalion of The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment has the unique Army distinction of still retaining a Third or ‘Colonel’s’ Colour. This distinction, dating from the late 17th Century, was inherited from The Queen’s Royal Regiment.

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After twenty-one years of active service in India, the 67th (South Hampshire) was ordered back to England in 1826. In commemoration of this, King George IV authorised the figure of the Royal Bengal Tiger with the word ‘India’ superscribed to be borne on its Regimental Colour and other appointments. The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment retains this honour today, maintains the nickname of ‘The Tigers’ and wears the Indian Tiger shoulder flash.

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Our Forebear Regiment 67th of Foot, having served 21 years of active service in India was ordered by to England in 1826. In commemoration of this, King George IV authorized the figure of the Royal Bengal Tiger with the word 'India' superscribed to be borne on its Regimental Colour and other appointments. The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment retains this honour today and maintains the nickname of 'The Tigers'.

Officers and Solider of the Regiment ware a 'Tiger' badge on their right arm.

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Tradition dictates that a Tiger Skin adorn the entrance to the Officers’ Mess and, in the entrance of the 2nd Battalion’s Mess, it provides a striking platform on which to mount the Latham Centrepiece with the Queen’s and Regimental Colours behind.

A much treasured piece it remains gnarled by hard use over many years: this is no indication of neglect more a conscious decision not to repair or replace the piece given the endangered species ranking of the great Bengal Tiger.

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Inscription: “2nd Battalion The Hampshire Regiment. In memory of all Officers who lost their lives between 1914 – 1918.”
The name of every officer to make the ultimate sacrifice whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion the Hampshire Regiment during the Great War is inscribed on silver plaques on either side of the base.

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The Tigers' Regimental Association is based at Regimental Headquarters at the Tower of London. Its main aims are to foster the spirit of comradeship between all members of the Regiment and to provide assistance to past and present members, their wives, children or other dependents who are in distress or suffering financial hardship. Its membership, which is free, comprises all officers and soldiers who have served or are serving in the Tigers. The forebear regiments also have their own regimental associations, the details of which can be obtained from Regimental Headquarters.

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THE TIGERS’ FOREBEAR REGIMENTS IN THE PENINSULAR WAR

Colonel Patrick Crowley, Deputy Colonel Heritage

The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment (PWRR) or ‘The Tigers’ have a long and distinguished military heritage, with strong connections to the Peninsular War of 1808-1814. This is particularly notable, when it comes to the commemoration of the Battle of Albuhera and the part played by:

• 3rd Foot, The Buffs, later The Royal East Kent Regiment,
• 2nd Battalion 31st Foot, later The East Surrey Regiment and

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The War of The Austrian Succession arose from a dispute between three candidates for the Austrian throne and Britain's principal enemies were again France and Spain.The Buffs, the 31st and the 37th Foot fought at Dettingen, which was a great victory and the last occasion on which an English king (George II) commanded his army in battle. George II was also quoted as saying to his wife Caroline on her death bed when she suggested that he remarry - "No I shall have mistresses".

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Conflict with France was to continue for many years, despite the end of King William III’s War. It was at this time that many other forebear regiments had their beginnings. They were known by the name of their Colonels, but this Guide will refer to them by their number as a Line regiment in order to avoid confusion, even though the numbering system was not introduced until 1750. Eighteen new regiments were to be raised in the period 1701–1702, six of which were primarily for sea service.

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After the end of the Second World War, there was a great deal of agitation amongst many of Britain’s colonies as local populations strove for independence, though the majority carried out the transition peacefully. It was also the period, when all of the Regiments’ ranks were filled with a high proportion of National Servicemen. All maintained the traditions and high standards of their regiments and this was to remain a key feature of life in the infantry up until 1963.