Search Again
event

The Queen’s, The Buffs (East Kent), 31st (Huntingdonshire), 50th (West Kent), 57th (West Middlesex), 67th (South Hampshire) and 77th (East Middlesex) all took part in the Peninsular campaign. The battle honours of Vimiera, Corunna, Douro, Talavera, Barrosa, Albuhera, Ciudad Rodrigo, Badajoz, Almaraz, Salamanca, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Nivelle, Nive, Orthes, Toulouse and Peninsula were won by forebear regiments. It is not surprising that the second Regimental Day of The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment, Albuhera, comes from this War.

artefact

This is an 1878 pattern British Blue Cloth Home Service Helmet.

This is an 1878 pattern British Blue Cloth Home Service Helmet.
The helmet plate (badge) has a Tudor Crown which was in use from 1901 to 1939.

Adopted by the British Army in 1878 it was in use as the full dress helmet until 1914. Nowadays only some of the regimental bands wear them.

story

The re-organisation of the Army in the early 1990s, called Options for Change, necessitated new Collects or regimental prayers, and provided the opportunity to amend existing ones. The current collection is the work of the Reverend R A McDowall and included the Regimental Collect of The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment. It is said at all religious services that include the Regiment and reads as follows:

story

The Tigers are a fighting regiment - we thrive on complex, tough operations. We are the senior English Regiment of the Line. We are forward looking, yet fiercely proud of our famous forebear regiments whose fighting spirit and traditions thrive in today’s Regiment.

artefact

This is a drum of the 2nd Battalion The Royal Sussex Regiment. The accompanying plaque reads: "Immediately prior to 1908 the 2nd Battalion drums were orange. The particular orange drum now carried by the 1st Battalion was taken to South Africa in 1900 by the detachment from the 2nd Battalion which was attached to the 1st Battalion during the South African War. It got back to the 2nd Battalion and was carried by Sergeant Crane throughout the First World War.

event

The 2nd Opium War is worth a special mention, as The Queen’s, The Buffs, the 31st (Huntingdonshire) and the 67th (South Hampshire) all participated in this conflict. It involved an Anglo-French Expeditionary Force, which compelled the Chinese to observe trading treaties. The most significant battle was the taking of the Taku Forts. When, in 1860, the Chinese emperor declined to reply to a note demanding an apology for firing on British ships and his government's failure to act on the provisions of the Treaty of Tientsin, a combined Anglo-French task force was sent to enforce compliance.

event

The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment was represented by its forebears in every theatre of the Second World War. Six battalions of The Queen’s, three of The Buffs, three of The East Surreys, , five battalions of The Royal Sussex, five battalions of The Queen’s Own Royal West Kents, three battalions of The Middlesex and the 2nd Battalion of The Hampshires to France went with the British Expeditionary Force. They were hopelessly ill-equipped to deal with the German Blitzkrieg (Lightning War) when it began on the 10th May 1940.

story

The 1st Battalion of The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment has the unique Army distinction of still retaining a Third or ‘Colonel’s’ Colour. This distinction, dating from the late 17th Century, was inherited from The Queen’s Royal Regiment.

event

After twenty-one years of active service in India, the 67th (South Hampshire) was ordered back to England in 1826. In commemoration of this, King George IV authorised the figure of the Royal Bengal Tiger with the word ‘India’ superscribed to be borne on its Regimental Colour and other appointments. The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment retains this honour today, maintains the nickname of ‘The Tigers’ and wears the Indian Tiger shoulder flash.

story

Our Forebear Regiment 67th of Foot, having served 21 years of active service in India was ordered by to England in 1826. In commemoration of this, King George IV authorized the figure of the Royal Bengal Tiger with the word 'India' superscribed to be borne on its Regimental Colour and other appointments. The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment retains this honour today and maintains the nickname of 'The Tigers'.

Officers and Solider of the Regiment ware a 'Tiger' badge on their right arm.