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The Ilderton Trophy is an oval shaped bowl with two angel handles surrounded by 4 statuettes which are 6.75 inches high. The statuettes, one at each corner, represent the period dress of 1661, 1750, 1810 and 1887. It was presented to the 2nd Bn The Queen's Own Royal West Surrey Regiment by Lt Col Charles Edward Ilderton DSO in 1894. Ilderton assumed command of the 1st Battalion on 29 September 1890. He retired as a full Colonel on 5 January 1905.

The inscription reads:

PRESENTED TO THE OFFICERS
2nd BATTALION THE QUEEN'S REGIMENT
ON THEIR RETURN FROM FOREIGN SERVICE

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This silver centrepiece, also known as a replica of the Jerningham-Kandler Wine Cooler, was one of the highly prized pieces of The Queen's Royal Regiment silver. It is a replica of the Jerningham-Kandler wine cooler sometimes known as "the Cistern" and known to hundreds of officers irreverently as "the flying tits". Valuable though it may be in itself, the replica in no way compares with the original which is currently in Russian hands in the St Petersburg Museum and has a long, interesting and intriguing history.

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The Lamassu silver is held in the Warrant Officers' and Sergeants' Mess of 1st Battalion The Tigers. The Lamassu refers to the Assyrian Empire which covered ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia in 1450 BC. Iraq would later become a country within this region some time later.

The Lamassu was a celestial being and protective deity, depicting power. This silver piece was bought by serving members of the Mess in recognition of the two operational tours the Battalion conducted in Iraq, on Operation TELIC 4 and 8.

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“In memory of the Peninsula campaign in which the Regiment was engaged from 1808 to 1814. Also the distinguished act of gallantry performed by Lieutenant Latham at the Battle of Albuhera in rescuing the King’s Colour of the Regiment from the hands of the enemy after Ensign Walsh and the Sergeants that protected it had fallen.”**

This is the 2nd Battalion’s most imposing piece of silver. Gargantuan in stature yet delicate and intricate in its detail, this is an irreplaceable item and an amazing example of early 19th century craftsmanship.

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In 1689 the Lord High Admiral’s Regiment, the 3rd Foot, was disbanded. The Holland Regiment took its place as the 3rd Regiment of Foot, and Prince George of Denmark, who was the husband of Princess (later Queen) Anne and Lord High Admiral, was appointed Honorary Colonel. From 1689 until his death in 1708, and following the custom of the time, The Holland Regiment was known as Prince George of Denmark’s Regiment.

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The first link that the Regiment had with HRH The Princess of Wales was in 1714 when The Queen's took on the title of HRH The Princess of Wales Own Royal Regiment. The then Princess of Wales was Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach, more commonly known as Caroline of Ansbach. She married the then Prince of Wales who later became King George II.

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This well known watercolour was originally on display in the Officer’s Mess at the Buffs Regimental Depot in Canterbury and is currently on display in the Officers’ Mess of Second Battalion the Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment. Referring to a man of East Kent – ‘Kentish’ describing someone of West Kent – it depicts a soldier of the Buffs (the Regiment of East Kent), walking in Flanders during the Great War. He is most likely from the 2nd Battalion.

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For most of the Regiment’s forebears, the Middle East featured as an area for operational tours during the period 1948–1956. Battalions from The East Surreys, The Royal Sussex, The Royal Hampshires and The Middlesex Regiments tackled problems associated with the Stern Gang and the Jewsish declaration of the Independent State of Israel in Palestine.

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Since the foundation of The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment on the 9th September 1992, the Regiment has continued to maintain the best traditions of the past, whilst establishing a sound professional reputation in its new guise. The inherited traditions are explained in other parts of this Online Museum; this chapter illustrates the activities of the current Regiment.

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Napoleon had signed the Amiens Treaty only to give himself time to prepare for his invasion of England and fourteen months later he declared war again on the trumped-up grounds that Britain had failed to hand back Malta to the Knights of St. John, in accordance with the Treaty. In October 1805, at Trafalgar, Nelson removed the threat of French invasion, which had led to the raising of some infantry regiment’s 2nd battalions, notably those of the 31st, the 35th, the 37th and the 67th.