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The Regimental Badge is a composition of the badges of the forebear regiments. The centrepiece is the Elizabethan Dragon, awarded to The Buffs, in recognition of their Tudor origin, by Queen Anne, probably in 1707.

Below the Tudor Dragon is the Hampshire Rose, as worn by the Trained Bands of Hampshire, who fought so gallantly for King Henry V at Agincourt in 1415.

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Marshal Soult was to receive his greatest defeat at the battle of Albuhera (Albuera), in southern Spain on the 16th May 1811. The Buffs (East Kent), the 31st (Huntingdonshire) and the 57th (West Middlesex) were all in Marshal Beresford’s allied army. Beresford took up position against the 23,000 French and Polish force astride a main road overlooking the village of Albuhera. The French attacked in massed columns supported by artillery firing grapeshot and came round the allies’ right flank, which was held by Spanish troops.

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1944 marked the heroic defence of Kohima by the 4th Battalion The Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment. The Battalion held out for fifteen days against a complete Japanese division, thereby buying enough time for two British divisions, which included the 1st Queen’s, to arrive and prevent the invasion of India. This was the turning point against the Japanese in Burma, for thereafter they were never able to mount an effective offensive.

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On the 1st August 1759, the 37th Foot fought at The Battle of Minden, during the Seven Years' War.This is now one of the three main Regimental Days of The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment. The French Army of Marshal de Contades was marching towards Hanover and to block this move, Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick, resolved to hold Minden. The Duke's force included six British infantry regiments, one of which was the 37th Foot. As the French approached, the British infantry were issued the confusing order to 'Advance with drums beating in proper time'.

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The Battle of Salerno is the third Regimental Day of The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment and the anniversary on the 9th September 1992 marked the formation of the new Regiment. The day was well chosen, as it commemorated the exemplary courage of members of The Queen’s and Hampshires, who landed on the beaches in 1943. Six territorial battalions of The Queen’s fought in the battle within 169 (Queen’s) Brigade and 131 (Queen’s) Brigade alongside three Hampshire battalions of 128 (Hampshire) Brigade. In addition, a number of Beach Groups were manned by Queensmen and Hampshire soldiers .

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All of the forebear regiments of The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment were represented in the Boer War in South Africa and the Volunteers provided reinforcements on operations. The 2nd Queen’s fought at the Tugela River and Spion Kop, where they were with the 2nd Middlesex and were also at The Relief of Ladysmith. The 2nd Buffs pursued the Boer leader Piet Cronje until he surrendered at Paardeberg, where they fought side-by-side with The 2nd Hampshires and later went on to Bloemfontein, where they were joined by the 1st Royal Sussex and occupied Pretoria.

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This large centrepiece of 3 figures consists of an officer with a cane and two soldiers carrying rifles on a rocky base sitting on a plinth which has a silver plate which lists all the battles in which the 23 Battalions of the Royal Sussex Regiment took part during WW1. This piece was the Regiment's main centre-piece commissioned after the Great War as a commemoration. Included among the Battle Honours is "Murman 1918-19", which is why the Royal Sussex always refer to WW I as the 1914-19 War.

artefact

Rope tensioned side drum of the Buffs (East Kent Regiment) later The Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment). From 1700 the drum was made of wood, usually ash and shows the Royal monogram, the Buffs dragon, the name and number of the regiment and battle honours. Drums did not change to metal until the beginning of the 1900s.

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The Army Cadet Force traces its origins to the Volunteer movement of 1859-60. Cadet units for boys, aged 12 and upwards, in schools and in the community, began in 1860. As an example, 40 cadets from the 1st Surrey Rifle Volunteer Corps were in a parade of 1000 cadets at Crystal Palace in 1861. The Officers’ Training Corps (OTC) was established in 1908 and cadets in schools transferred to the OTC, which later became the Combined Cadet Forces. In 1910 a new Cadet Force was started under the County Territorial Force Associations, forerunners of the Reserve Forces’ and Cadets’ Associations.