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This Silver Pocket Watch is held in the PWRR & Queen's Regimental Museum.

On the reverse of the watch, has the following text engraved:

Presented to No 9050 Pte J G Kemmitt 2nd Bn The Queen’s Royal Regiment (West Surrey) by Major A N Roberts in grateful appreciation of many years faithful service as Batman and his gallant conduct at Zwartelen 7th Nov 1914, when hearing I was lying wounded in an
exposed position he at once came to me and carried me to a place of safety.

This watch is still in working order.

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After the Eighth Army’s victory in the North Africa, in 1943 women workers at Quebec Ordnance Factory subscribed together and presented a 6 pounder Anti-Tank Gun with inscribed plates to be given to the Regiment having the best days “shot during” during the advance from Alamein to Tunis.

General Montgomery, commanding Eighth Army decided that the 7th Armoured Division should receive the presentation in recognition of the decisive part played by the Division in the Battle of Medenine.

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The period between the Napoleonic Wars and the Crimean War was dominated by ‘small’ wars throughout the Empire. The Queen’s and the 31st (Huntingdonshire) served in the 1st Afghan War of 1839-1842, whilst the Buffs (East Kent) and the 50th (‘Queens Own’ Regiment from 1831) escorted prisoners to Australia and took part in the Gwalior campaign of 1843. The 35th served in the West Indies, Ireland and Mauritius, becoming The 35th ‘Royal’ Sussex Regiment in 1832. The 57th (West Middlesex) went to Australia and India, whilst the 77th (East Middlesex) served in Ireland, Jamaica, Malta and Canada.

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This Snuff Box was the only bit of regimental silver recovered by divers in the 1970s after the sinking of the Honourable East India Company Ship Kent in 1825.

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This shoe shaped snuff box was presented by Lieutenant Colonel Douglas Alleyne to the Officers' of the 37th North Hampshire Regiment in October 1887. The engraving also shows the inscription of 'GOOD BYE and GOOD LUCK!!' We can therefore assume that Lieutenant Colonel Alleyne, presented this item at this farewell dinner on his handing over command of the 37th. It can be seen in the picture of the interior that there remains a small amount of dusty substance. It is believed that this is snuff although no one has volunteered to try it.

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There remains plenty of opportunity for sport in the modern Regiment, though operational tours and training schedules keep people busy.

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One of our finest silver statuettes, it depicts an immaculately moustached officer circa 1901 in the uniform of an officer of the Boer War. It is mounted on a silver ground and wooden base with silver inscription plate. It is understood that the piece was an internal Battalion award recognising the most efficient Infantryman, Platoon or Company at any given time, having been instituted in 1905.

The inscription reads, “1st Battalion Queen’s Royal Regiment infantry efficiency prize 1904-05”

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LCpl Harman served with the 4th Battalion The Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment serving in Burma. The Battalion held out for fifteen days against a complete Japanese division, thereby buying enough time for two British divisions to arrive and prevent the invasion of India. It was at Kohima that LCpl Harman won his VC by first killing a Japanese machine gun crew and capturing the gun singlehanded, then rushing another post alone and killing all five Japanese in it. He was then killed by a burst of enemy machine gun fire.

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The Lieutenant Colonel Harrison statuette is a silver statuette of a private soldier of the Regiment in the period dress of 1815 mounted on a wooden plinth. Due to its historical period this piece is often displayed in conjunction with a fine statuette of a mounted Duke of Wellington.

The inscription reads, “Presented to the 2nd Battalion Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regt by Lt Col Harrison”

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This expression has been used for many years by people with no connection with the Regiment, but who assume that it originated in some desperate battle. The truth is less exciting. In August 1857 a 2nd Battalion was raised in Limerick and moved to Malta where it shared a barracks with the Royal Scots Fusiliers. The Adjutant of the 2nd Buffs, named Cotter, had been a sergeant-major in The Royal Scots Fusiliers and, to encourage recruits on drill parades, was wont to shout ‘Steady, The Buffs! The Fusiliers are watching you!’