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This well known watercolour was originally on display in the Officer’s Mess at the Buffs Regimental Depot in Canterbury and is currently on display in the Officers’ Mess of Second Battalion the Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment. Referring to a man of East Kent – ‘Kentish’ describing someone of West Kent – it depicts a soldier of the Buffs (the Regiment of East Kent), walking in Flanders during the Great War. He is most likely from the 2nd Battalion.

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This is an 1878 pattern British Blue Cloth Home Service Helmet.

This is an 1878 pattern British Blue Cloth Home Service Helmet.
The helmet plate (badge) has a Tudor Crown which was in use from 1901 to 1939.

Adopted by the British Army in 1878 it was in use as the full dress helmet until 1914. Nowadays only some of the regimental bands wear them.

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This is a drum of the 2nd Battalion The Royal Sussex Regiment. The accompanying plaque reads: "Immediately prior to 1908 the 2nd Battalion drums were orange. The particular orange drum now carried by the 1st Battalion was taken to South Africa in 1900 by the detachment from the 2nd Battalion which was attached to the 1st Battalion during the South African War. It got back to the 2nd Battalion and was carried by Sergeant Crane throughout the First World War.

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Tradition dictates that a Tiger Skin adorn the entrance to the Officers’ Mess and, in the entrance of the 2nd Battalion’s Mess, it provides a striking platform on which to mount the Latham Centrepiece with the Queen’s and Regimental Colours behind.

A much treasured piece it remains gnarled by hard use over many years: this is no indication of neglect more a conscious decision not to repair or replace the piece given the endangered species ranking of the great Bengal Tiger.

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Inscription: “2nd Battalion The Hampshire Regiment. In memory of all Officers who lost their lives between 1914 – 1918.”
The name of every officer to make the ultimate sacrifice whilst serving with the 2nd Battalion the Hampshire Regiment during the Great War is inscribed on silver plaques on either side of the base.

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This bronze bust of a Tiger on a wooden plinth with the Regimental Badge, by Mark Coreth, who is well know for his sculptures of animals in motion, was commissioned my Lieutenant Colonel Adam Edmounds, who Commanded The 3rd Battalion from 2006 to 2008, presenting it to the Officers' Mess on departing the Battalion.

This piece is a fine example of Mark Coreth's work.

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This silver tiger statuette celebrates the recipients of the Needlemakers’ Sword, which is presented to the outstanding subaltern of the battalion each year, as selected by his superiors and peers. It was presented by Lieutenant Colonel AP Guthrie TD, who was the Commanding Officer of the 3rd Battalion from 2003 to 2015. The font silver plinth details those individuals who have received this prestigious award.

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This scarlet tunic from the Royal Sussex Regiment showing details of the metal shoulder title of the 5th Territorial Battalion the Royal Sussex Regiment also a button on the tunic and the collar badge.

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One of the most dazzling pieces in the Officers’ Mess, the Petit jugs are always on display in a prominent place. They are in immaculate condition with their exquisitely ornate detail shining to a high polish. The Petit jugs are a pair of highly ornate silver claret jugs, with lids and applied vine leafs to the bodies. Unlike the Queen’s decanters they are not used for pouring wine, but are reserved only for display.

The inscription reads, “From the relatives of the late John Petit CB Lt Col Commanding the 50th Regiment.”

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These pieces are amongst the most delicate and ornate of any held in the Officers’ Mess. They consist of twin pairs of claret decanters with chased silver mounts to the neck with animals and female masks. Model paschal lamb stoppers adorn the tops, with supporting silver bases in the form of 3 sphinxes – indicating the inherited battle honour from the Queen’s of Egypt which underpins all others on the Regimental Colour. The main bodies consist of etched glass bodies engraved with Regimental insignia, bows, floral and leaf patterns.