Search Again
artefact

A highly decorative embroidery, depicting the Badge of Kneller Hall and the Regimental Badge of The Royal Hampshire Regiment. These were traditionally placed on the front of the music stands of each of the instruments played when the Band is giving a seated concert, such as in a Band Stand or when a small group such as a quartet is playing at a small function.

artefact

On the 1st July, 1916, under heavy enemy fire, the 8th Battalion East Surrey Regiment were waiting in their trenches ready to go "over the top" in the first Battle of the Somme. Their objective was Montauban Ridge.

Captain WP Nevill, attached from the East Yorkshire Regiment and commanding "B" Company had purchased four footballs for his platoons to kick across No Man's Land "subject to the proviso that proper formation and distance was not lost thereby". Captain Nevill promised a reward to the first platoon to score a "goal" in enemy trenches.

artefact

Colour-Sergeant Thomas Ferrett, DCM of D Company 2nd Battalion The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey) Regiment was awarded this scarf in South Africa, August 1901. Mrs Ferrett is seen wearing the scarf after her husband sent it back to England for her.

artefact

A highly decorative piece of embroidery, depicting the Regimental Badge of The Queen's Regiment. These were traditionally placed on the front of the music stands of each of the instruments played when the Band was giving a seated concert, such as in a Band Stand or when a small group such as a quartet were playing at a small function.

artefact

An unusual award, in the form of a long scarf crocheted by Queen Victoria, was made to selected servicemen during the South African War. It was apparently worn over the shoulder, passing under the shoulder strap, across the chest and buckled on the right hip. The description of the scarf is given as "..crocheted in Khaki-coloured Berlin wool, approximately nine inches wide and five foot long, including a four inch fringe at each end, and bears the Royal Cipher V.R.I. (Victoria Regina Et Imperatrix)..."

artefact

The SS St Lawrence is the ship which the 2nd Battalion The Buffs Regiment sailed for Cape Town from Dublin, on the 13th October 1876. The party comprised of 444 Officers, Men and Families. On the 7th November she struck a reef in the Paternoster Bay. Women and children were moved onto lifeboats and taken to shore , follow by the officers and men of the Battalion and the crew of SS St Lawrence. All accounts of the wreck pay tribute to the discipline and good behaviour of the men, who for forty-eight hours worked almost continuously, many in waist deep water landing baggage and stores.

artefact

This Silver Pocket Watch is held in the PWRR & Queen's Regimental Museum.

On the reverse of the watch, has the following text engraved:

Presented to No 9050 Pte J G Kemmitt 2nd Bn The Queen’s Royal Regiment (West Surrey) by Major A N Roberts in grateful appreciation of many years faithful service as Batman and his gallant conduct at Zwartelen 7th Nov 1914, when hearing I was lying wounded in an
exposed position he at once came to me and carried me to a place of safety.

This watch is still in working order.

artefact

On the 1st July, 1916, under heavy enemy fire, the 8th Battalion East Surrey Regiment were waiting in their trenches ready to go "over the top" in the first Battle of the Somme. Their objective was Montauban Ridge.

Captain WP Nevill, attached from the East Yorkshire Regiment and commanding "B" Company had purchased four footballs for his platoons to kick across No Man's Land "subject to the proviso that proper formation and distance was not lost thereby". Captain Nevill promised a reward to the first platoon to score a "goal" in enemy trenches.

artefact

Tradition dictates that a Tiger Skin adorn the entrance to the Officers’ Mess and, in the entrance of the 2nd Battalion’s Mess, it provides a striking platform on which to mount the Latham Centrepiece with the Queen’s and Regimental Colours behind.

A much treasured piece it remains gnarled by hard use over many years: this is no indication of neglect more a conscious decision not to repair or replace the piece given the endangered species ranking of the great Bengal Tiger.

artefact

This bronze bust of a Tiger on a wooden plinth with the Regimental Badge, by Mark Coreth, who is well know for his sculptures of animals in motion, was commissioned my Lieutenant Colonel Adam Edmounds, who Commanded The 3rd Battalion from 2006 to 2008, presenting it to the Officers' Mess on departing the Battalion.

This piece is a fine example of Mark Coreth's work.