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This British issue anti-tank grenade, also known as Energa, was originally purchased from the Belgians to be fired from the No 4 .303 Rifle, made in Belgium by Mecar. These are early practice versions. They have a steel head are black and carry white markings.

The Dover museum holds three of these all slightly different.

a] Marked “TRAINING RIFLE GRENADE ENERGA”

b] Marked “GREN RIFLE AT 94 MK2” has a yellow band then marked “4-53” (denoting April 1953)

c] Marked “GREN RIFLE AT 94 MK2” has a green band the marked “5-54” (denoting May 1954)

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The Hawkins grenade was in use from 1942 to about 1955 by the British Army and the Home Guard.

After the evacuation from Dunkirk in May/June 1940 it was realised that there was the need for a new anti-tank weapon. It was roughly four months later Captain Hawkins submitted a design for a hand thrown anti-tank mine. After successful trails the General Staff placed an initial order for 2.5 million Hawkins Grenades.

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This is a light multi-use weapon, consisting of a brass knuckleduster and a short single edged blade. It could be used in various ways during a silent attack to kill or disable the enemy. The blade is marked “Sheffield” and on the other side marked “Pound 67 Piccadilly”.

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The Battle of Minden, which took place during the Seven Year’s War of 1756-63, was the first time that infantry were able to successfully engage and defeat Cavalry.

The Battle itself took place on 1st August 1759 north west of the town of Minden. The Allied armies (Commanded by Ferdinand Duke of Brunswick) formed up on Minden Heath in order to oppose the French. The aim was to prevent the French from securing Hanover by bringing them to battle. The main body, with the 37th Foot in the first line was ready by 7am.

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The Mark 2 was utilized by the U.S. military as their primary fragmentation grenade from WWII to the Vietnam War and nicknamed the “iron pineapple”.

This example was the practice version of the Mark 2. It is the RFX Mark 21 Defensive Hand Grenade. Painted olive drab the original colour would have been light blue. The hole at the base has no thread as it would have been plugged with a cork. On the body is marked “R F X” and “1”. The top of the lever is marked “FUSE M205A1” (this is a practice fuse), “LS-4-7” and “7-53” (this is the date of manufacture July 1953).

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After the Eighth Army’s victory in the North Africa, in 1943 women workers at Quebec Ordnance Factory subscribed together and presented a 6 pounder Anti-Tank Gun with inscribed plates to be given to the Regiment having the best days “shot during” during the advance from Alamein to Tunis.

General Montgomery, commanding Eighth Army decided that the 7th Armoured Division should receive the presentation in recognition of the decisive part played by the Division in the Battle of Medenine.

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This is believed to be a Swiss Sapper and Pioneer sword Model 1842 - 1875. It has a 19 inch saw back blade, 26 inches overall length with a brass cruciform hilt. The hilt is stamped 1844

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The type 14 was an early hand grenade from WW1 but was not mass produced as it was felt the type 36 was a much better weapon.

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Commonly known as the Very pistol this artefact was manufactured in Birmingham during 1918 by Webley and Scott Ltd and shows slight damage to the rim. Mainly brass with wooden hand grips it is attached to a lanyard that would be connected to the firer to prevent loss. The military proof marks and maker’s marks can be seen. It was introduced in 1914 and was used extensively by British and Empire armed forces during World War 1. This version is the Number 1 Mark III* as it has a bell shaped mouth safety hand guard fitted to the front of the barrel.