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This picture shows the dining room of the Officers' Mess. used for both formal and routine dining by the Officers of the Battalion, it is dominated by the campaign table, which is believed to be more than 200 years old. Campaign furniture was used by officers and their staffs during military campaigns, and were most often hand crafted by master cabinet makers. They would have strong but removable fittings, making it easy to break up the tables for transportation as battles and campaigns progressed. The table is flanked by portraits and silver belonging to the Regiment's forebears.

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This magnificent silver centrepiece was inherited from the 3rd Battalion, The Middlesex Regiment and displays six statuettes depicting six different forms of dress, relating to theatres in which the Battalion served. Scrolled around the base, are names of battle honours awarded to the Regiment.

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One of three Middlesex Regiment Menu holders .

Each one is engrave with the presenting officers rank and name:

Lieutenant William C Hendricks

2nd Lieutenant J E Knowles

2nd Lieutenant A K Budge

These items are used to hold Menus Cards, with details of the lavish sustenance at Regimental Dinners, held by our forebears.

These items are currently used at Regimental Headquarters, The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment, Tower of London.

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The Dalhousie Tureen is an impressive, large silver soup tureen with cover and is inherited from the Queen's (Second) Royal Surrey Regiment. It is a rectangular shape with ‘reeded’ rim, engraved with Dalhousie and the Queen’s Regiment crest on the long side. It has ring handles within rams heads mounted on each end. The tureen sits on 4 large ball and claw feet. The cover is plain with a full model paschal lamb, the iconic emblem of the Royal Surrey Regiment, mounted atop.

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This is another piece of silver that is steeped in tradition and ceremony. The piece itself is a highly chased and ornate silver standing salt pot, with cover and spoon. The top is in a crown pattern with “XXXI” embossed on the body. The lid is surmounted with an oak tree with hunting dogs beneath. Inside the lid a fragment of the 31st Regiment’s Colours is mounted. This fragment is from the Colours carried at the Battle of Sobraon, Punjab, during the Sikh Wars of 1846.

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One of the most dazzling pieces in the Officers’ Mess, the Petit jugs are always on display in a prominent place. They are in immaculate condition with their exquisitely ornate detail shining to a high polish. The Petit jugs are a pair of highly ornate silver claret jugs, with lids and applied vine leafs to the bodies. Unlike the Queen’s decanters they are not used for pouring wine, but are reserved only for display.

The inscription reads, “From the relatives of the late John Petit CB Lt Col Commanding the 50th Regiment.”

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These pieces are amongst the most delicate and ornate of any held in the Officers’ Mess. They consist of twin pairs of claret decanters with chased silver mounts to the neck with animals and female masks. Model paschal lamb stoppers adorn the tops, with supporting silver bases in the form of 3 sphinxes – indicating the inherited battle honour from the Queen’s of Egypt which underpins all others on the Regimental Colour. The main bodies consist of etched glass bodies engraved with Regimental insignia, bows, floral and leaf patterns.